Good morning.

Celtic Claddaugh

Celtic Claddaugh

I was up kind of late last night, so right now my brain is foggy, and I’m not feeling profound (not yet, anyway. I’m only on my first cup of coffee.) I will take the easy way out with my first post of the day and just do a little copy/paste for you of something from one of my favorite daily subscriptions, “The Writer’s Almanac with Garrison Keillor.” He quotes Irish poet Brendan Kennelly, and I agree with what Brendan says in this passage on the amazing legacy of being born of Ireland (or in the US of Irish descent, as am I, thanks to both my parents), and I can’t argue with how he characterizes poetry.

Garrison writes today,

irish-dance

Brendan Kennelly

Brendan Kennelly

It’s the birthday of Irish poet Brendan Kennelly born in Ballylongford, County Kerry (1936). He’s a literature professor at Trinity College in Dublin, and a very popular poet—he has published more than 20 books of poems. He said, “To be born in Ireland is to inherit not only one of the most beautiful little countries in the world, but also an entire legacy of prejudices, hatreds, clichés, and an impressive supply of apparently invincible ignorance.” One of his best-known works is Cromwell (1983), a book-length poem about the English leader who invaded Ireland in the mid-1700s and sought to wipe-out Catholicism. Another of his books is The Book of Judas (1991), a 400-page epic poem from Judas’s point of view. He said: “Poetry is, above all, a singing art of natural and magical connection because, though it is born out of one’s person’s solitude, it has the ability to reach out and touch in a humane and warmly illuminating way the solitude, even the loneliness, of others. That is why, to me, poetry is one of the most vital treasures that humanity possesses; it is a bridge between separated souls.”

Image of Claddaugh ring from abbeysatticjewelry.com via the Web
Image of Brendan Kennelly from geocities.com via the Web
Image of dancers from socalirishdance.com via the Web

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